Journal of Gambling Studies

, Volume 10, Issue 3, pp 237–246 | Cite as

Casino gaining offense inmates: What are these men like?

  • Donald I. Templer
  • Jackie Moten
  • George Kaiser
Articles

Abstract

The characteristics of 28 men convicted for casino gaming offenses in Nevada were determined. Twenty-seven of these inmates cheated using slot or video poker machines. Most of the subjects used slugs. The other cheated at cards. Compared to other inmates, a disproportionate number of inmates were white. There were no black inmates incarcerated for this crime. Eighteen (57%) of the gaming offenders were over the age of 40 when convicted, in significant comparison to 27% of the general population inmates. They had significantly more aliases than the general population inmates. None of the gaming offenders had a history of violent felony convictions. They had, however, a history of great social, marital, occupational, and financial instability in addition to a criminal life style.

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Donald I. Templer
    • 1
  • Jackie Moten
    • 1
  • George Kaiser
    • 1
  1. 1.Southern Desert Correctional CenterNevada

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