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Journal of Traumatic Stress

, Volume 9, Issue 4, pp 687–702 | Cite as

Children's selective coping after a bus disaster: Confronting behavior and perceived support

  • Norman (Noach) Milgram
  • Yosef H. Toubiana
Regular Articles
  • 21 Downloads

Abstract

Data were obtained from 675 seventh graders grieving the death of 19 and injury of 14 fellow students in a traffic accident. Frequency of confronting behaviors was inversely related to their intensity. Perceived helpfulness of the various support person categories (oneself, parents, siblings, relatives, friends, classmates, classroom teachers, guidance counselors, psychologists) was related to current stress levels, context of the disaster, and prior helping relationships. Personal loss and situational variables affected confronting behavior and stress reaction levels. Specific helpful support persons affected interest in individual and/or group treatment. Findings were consistent with a model of search and selection of helpful support persons in community-wide stressful situations.

Key words

coping disaster confronting social support 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Norman (Noach) Milgram
    • 1
  • Yosef H. Toubiana
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PsychologyTel-Aviv UniversityRamat-AvivIsrael
  2. 2.The Peter CompanyPetach TikvaIsrael

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