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Journal of Traumatic Stress

, Volume 9, Issue 3, pp 607–612 | Cite as

Psychiatric morbidity following Hurricane Andrew

  • Daniella David
  • Thomas A. Mellman
  • Lourdes M. Mendoza
  • Renee Kulick-Bell
  • Gail Ironson
  • Neil Schneiderman
Brief Report

Abstract

The nature of psychiatric morbidity in previously non-ill subjects from the area most affected by Hurricane Andrew was investigated at 6–12 months posthurricane. Preliminary associations of morbidity with personal and event-related risk factors were also determined. Fifty one percent (31/61) met criteria for a new-onset disorder, including posttraumatic stress disorder (PTSD) in 36%, major depression (MD) in 30%, and other anxiety disorders in 20%. Thirty four subjects (56%) had significant symptoms persisting beyond 6 months. Having sustained “severe damage” was the risk factor most strongly associated with outcome. Our data underscore the range of psychiatric morbidity related to a natural disaster, and suggest a relationship to chronic stressors.

Key words

posttraumatic stress disorder disaster hurricane 

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Copyright information

© International Society for Traumatic Stress Studies 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniella David
    • 1
  • Thomas A. Mellman
    • 1
  • Lourdes M. Mendoza
    • 1
  • Renee Kulick-Bell
    • 1
  • Gail Ironson
    • 1
  • Neil Schneiderman
    • 1
  1. 1.Departments of Psychiatry and Health PsychologyUniversity of MiamiMiami

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