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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 20, Issue 11, pp 2959–2974 | Cite as

Effects of host plant,Gossypium hirsutum L., on sexual attraction of cabbage looper moths,Trichoplusia ni (Hübner) (Lepidoptera: Noctuidae)

  • P. J. Landolt
  • R. R. Heath
  • J. G. Millar
  • K. M. Davis-Hernandez
  • B. D. Dueben
  • K. E. Ward
Article

Abstract

Unmated female or male cabbage looper moths,Trichoplusia ni (Hübner), were attracted more often in a flight tunnel to a cage with moths of the opposite sex and a bouquet of cotton foliage. Increased sexual attractiveness of females with plants may be a result of stimulation of pheromone release in response to plant odor, since more males were attracted when odor of cotton foliage was passed over females than when odor of females was passed over cotton foliage before venting into the flight tunnel. Increased sexual attractiveness of males with plants is due in part to host odor enhancement of female attraction to male pheromone, since more females were attracted to synthetic male pheromone (a blend of enantiomers of linalool and isomers of cresol) and a cotton leaf extract than were attracted to male pheromone alone. A short synthesis procedure was developed for (S)-(+)-linalool, the major component of the male sex pheromone, isolated from hair pencils, used in these tests.

Key words

Cabbage looper Trichoplusia ni Lepidoptera Noctuidae pheromone kairomone attractants host finding (S)-(+)-linalool 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. J. Landolt
    • 1
  • R. R. Heath
    • 1
  • J. G. Millar
    • 2
  • K. M. Davis-Hernandez
    • 1
  • B. D. Dueben
    • 1
  • K. E. Ward
    • 1
  1. 1.U.S. Department of AgricultureAgricultural Research Service Insect Attractants, Behavior, and Basic Biologv Research LaboratoryGainesville
  2. 2.Department of EntomologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiverside

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