Neohelicon

, Volume 14, Issue 2, pp 83–95 | Cite as

Gilgamesh: Anonymous tradition and authorial value

  • John Maier
Article
  • 47 Downloads

Keywords

Ancient Text Thematic Shift Clay Tablet Narrative Poem Sexual Allure 

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Literatur

  1. 1.
    Gilgamesh, Translated from the Sin-leqi-unninni Version by John Gardner and John Maier, with the Assistance of Richard A. Henshaw (New York: Knopf, 1984). The passage (I. iv. 6–21) is translated on p. 77.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    In Paul Auvray, Pierre Poulain, and Albert Blaise,Sacred Languages, transl. J. Tester (New York: Hawthorne Books, 1960 [1957], pp. 97–98.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    Erica Reiner,Šurpu: A Collection of Sumerian and Akkadian Incantations (Osnabrück: Biblio Verlag, 1970), pp. 36–38.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    J. V. Kinnier Wilson, “An Introduction to Babylonian Psychiatry,”Assyriological Studies (Chicago) 16 (1965), 289–298. In the incantation we have considered, note afflicted the man suffers because “his god” has withdrawn from him.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Paul Ricœur,The Symbolism of Evil, transl. Emerson Buchanan (Boston: Beacon Press, 1967), p. 187.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Symbolism, pp. 190–191.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    See W. G. Lambert, “A Catalogue of Texts and Authors”,Journal of Cuneiform Studies 16 (1962), 66.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Jeffrey H. Tigay,The Evolution of the Gilgamesh Epic (Philadelphia: Pennsylvania UP, 1982), pp. 241–250, gives an overview of the versions ofGilgamesh.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    —— pp. 173–176, and Appendix, pp. 275–290.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Poulain (p. 98) notes the complete absence of these Stoic virtues in the vocabulary of the New Testament.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó 1987

Authors and Affiliations

  • John Maier

There are no affiliations available

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