Journal of Youth and Adolescence

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 73–92 | Cite as

A social skills analysis in childhood and adolescence using symbolic interactionism

  • Alan Russell
Article

Abstract

Support is obtained from the literature about the need for advances in the conceptualization of “social skills.” There is agreement that much is known about how to improve social skills, but less attention has been given to what to change or improve. The present article outlines a model of social skills in childhood and adolescence using the concepts and literature on symbolic interactionism in an attempt to provide a possible conceptual framework for social skills. The proposed model is organized around the concepts of role-taking, role-making, definition of the situation, and self. Each concept is taken in turn and how it could contribute to the analysis or understanding of social skills in childhood and adolescence is shown. The article concludes with a discussion of ways in which the proposed scheme might be used in one area of social skills — friendship making. Some possible difficulties and limitations in the model are noted.

Keywords

Conceptual Framework Health Psychology Present Article Social Skill School Psychology 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • Alan Russell
    • 1
  1. 1.School of EducationFlinders UniversityBedford Park

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