Cellular and Molecular Neurobiology

, Volume 16, Issue 3, pp 445–450 | Cite as

Action of steroid hormones on growth and differentiation of CNS and spinal cord organotypic cultures

  • A. Levy
  • M. Garcia Segura
  • Z. Nevo
  • Y. David
  • A. Shahar
  • F. Naftolin
Article

Summary

During the prenatal period, gonadal steroid environment induces dramatic sexually dimorphic changes in the nervous system.

We have usedin vitro methods to study the mechanism and timing of hormonal influences on neuronal sprouting and myelination during the prenatal period.

Organotypic cultures of hypothalamus and lumbar spinal cord (SC) slices from rat fetuses were grown on plasma clot or in hyaluronic acid and exposed to estogen (17β estradiol) and testosterone (T) during cultivation. Both steroid hormones were active: 17β estradiol enhanced sprouting of hypothalamic neuronal fibers and increased the amount of synapses. In SC cultures T induced regeneration of thick nerve processes and an early onset of myelination, mainly of peripheral myelin.

Key words

Steroids in vitro nervous system myelin 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. Arnold, A. P., and Gorski, R. A. (1984). Gonadal steroid induction of structural differences in the central nervous system.Annu. Rev. Neurosci. 7413–442.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. Dohler, K. D. (1991). The pre- and postnatal influence of hormones and neurotransmitters on sexual differentiation of the mammalian hypothalamus.Int. Rev. Cytol. 3111–57.Google Scholar
  3. Gahwiler, B. H. (1984). Slice cultures of cerebellar hippocampal and hypothalamic tissue.Experientia 40235–243.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  4. Hauser, K. F., MacLusky, N. J., and Toran-Allerand, C. D. (1987). Androgen action in fetal mouse spinal cord cultures; Metabolic and morphologic effects.Brain Res. 40662–72.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. Junk-Testas, J., Schumacher, M., Robel, P., and Baulieu, E. E. (1994). Action of steroid hormones and growth factors on glial cells of the central and peripheral nervous system.J. Steroid Biochem. Mol. Biol. 48145–154.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. Naftolin, F., Ryan, K. J., Davis, I., Reddy, V. V., Flores, F., Petro, Z., Kuhn, M., White, R. J., Takaos, Y., and Wolin, L. (1975). The formation of estrogen by central neuroendocrine tissues.Recent Prog. Hormone Res. 31295–315.Google Scholar
  7. Toran-Allerand, C. D. (1980). Sex steroid and the development of the newborn mouse hypothalamus and preoptic areain vitro. II. Morphological correlates and hormonal specificity.Brain Res. 189413–427.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. Levy
    • 1
  • M. Garcia Segura
    • 2
  • Z. Nevo
    • 3
  • Y. David
    • 1
  • A. Shahar
    • 1
  • F. Naftolin
    • 4
  1. 1.Israel Institute for Biological ResearchNess ZionaIsrael
  2. 2.Cajal InstituteMadridSpain
  3. 3.Sackler Faculty of MedicineTel Aviv UniversityTel AvivIsrael
  4. 4.Yale UniversityNew Haven

Personalised recommendations