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Journal of Social Distress and the Homeless

, Volume 4, Issue 1, pp 43–56 | Cite as

A portrait of America's children: The impact of poverty and a call to action

  • Charles N. Oberg
  • Nicholas A. Bryant
  • Marilyn L. Bach
Article

Abstract

The responsibility for children's services is disseminated between a multitude of advocacy organizations, social service agencies, and numerous departments within our government. A lack of conceptual integration and fiscal commitment is evident at the federal, state, and local levels. The examination of poverty and children's lack of economic security, inadequate medical care, homelessness, and nutrition inadequacies reveals a portrait of America's children that is both unsettling and alarming. The paper concludes with a call for action and the commitment that will be required to rectify this problem.

Key words

poverty homelessness hunger uninsured 

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Copyright information

© Human Sciences Press, Inc 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Charles N. Oberg
    • 1
  • Nicholas A. Bryant
    • 2
  • Marilyn L. Bach
    • 3
  1. 1.Deputy Medical DirectorHennepin County Medical CenterMinneapolis
  2. 2.University of MinnesotaMinneapolis
  3. 3.Department of Laboratory Medicine and PathologyUniversity of Minnesota Medical SchoolMinneapolis

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