Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

, Volume 39, Issue 10, pp 1130–1135 | Cite as

Asymptomatic colorectal cancer detected by screening

  • Haruhiko Shida
  • Kanako Ban
  • Masao Matsumoto
  • Kozo Masuda
  • Tomohiro Imanari
  • Takehisa Machida
  • Takashi Yamamoto
  • Tohru Inoue
Original Contributions

Abstract

PURPOSE: Colorectal cancer screening has become prevalent. To discuss the efficacy of screening, we studied the characteristics of asymptomatic Colorectal cancer detected by screening. METHODS: This is a retrospective review of patients with colorectal cancer treated at our institution. During the past 20 years, 96 of 1,046 cases of colorectal cancer were asymptomatic and detected by screening. Sixty-one of these cases were detected in the recent five years. The initial screening procedures were fecal occult blood test in 51 cases, sigmoidoscopy or colonoscopy in 18, barium enema in 9, and other tests in 18. RESULTS: Thirteen lesions (14 percent) were smaller than 1.0 cm and 32 (33 percent) were 1–2 cm in size. There were 34 Tis, 21 T1, and 8 T2 tumors. Of the 55 Tis or T1 lesions, 14 showed nonpolypoid growth (5 flat-elevated, 7 flat-elevated with depression, 1 flat, 1 depressed), and 12 of these were detected on endoscopy. Thirty-four cases were TNM Stage 0, 25 were Stage I, 16 were Stage II, 12 were Stage III, and 9 were Stage IV. Sixty-one percent of those detected by screening were in either Stage 0 or Stage I compared with 16 percent in the symptomatic group. Cumulative five-year disease-free survival rates were 100 percent for both Stage 0 and Stage I, 94 percent for Stage II, and 52 percent for Stage III. Overall cumulative five-year survival rate was 87 percent for those detected by screening, compared with 57 percent in symptomatic patients. CONCLUSIONS: Asymptomatic cancers detected by screening were at a less advanced stage. In particular, many nonpolypoid early cancers were detected by endoscopic screening.

Key words

Screening Colorectal cancer Nonpolypoid early cancer 

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Copyright information

© American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Haruhiko Shida
    • 1
  • Kanako Ban
    • 1
  • Masao Matsumoto
    • 1
  • Kozo Masuda
    • 1
  • Tomohiro Imanari
    • 1
  • Takehisa Machida
    • 1
  • Takashi Yamamoto
    • 1
  • Tohru Inoue
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryTokyo Kosei Nenkin HospitalTokyoJapan
  2. 2.Department of PathologyTokyo Kosei Nenkin HospitalTokyoJapan

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