Advertisement

Relationship between anticomplement in seminal plasma and complement in follicular fluid associated with outcome in an in vitro fertilization program

  • Natalia Zabludovsky
  • Yona Barak
  • Benjamin Bartoov
  • Tamar Lublin-Tennenbaum
  • Fina Eltes
  • Ami Amit
  • Abraham Kogosowski
Clinical Assisted Reproduction
  • 25 Downloads

Abstract

Purpose: The study was conducted to evaluate levels of anticomplement in seminal plasma and levels of complement in follicular fluid, in correlation with fertilization and pregnancy rate after in vitro fertilization and intracytoplasmic sperm injection programs.

Materials and Methods: Anticomplement levels were determined in 70 couples undergoing in vitro fertilization therapy. In 15 of these couples, complement levels were measured. Anticomplement and complement levels were also determined in an additional 21 couples (apart from the 70 couples) undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection treatment.

Results: A correlation was found between fertilization rate and anticomplement levels in the seminal plasma (r=0.4,P<0.01) after standard in vitro fertilization. No correlation was found in the intracytoplasmic sperm injection group, or observed between complement levels and any parameter examined in both groups. Pregnancy occurred only in those couples with an anticomplement: complement ratio below 0.49.

Conclusions: Determination of anticomplement and complement levels may contribute to the assessment of a successful outcome of in vitro fertilization/intracytoplasmic sperm injection.

Key words

anticomplement complement in vitro fertilization intracytoplasmic sperm injection 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Ahmed SH, Renhale WJ, Tala N: Sex hormones immune response and autoimmune disease. Am J Pathol 1985;121:531–551PubMedGoogle Scholar
  2. 2.
    Stern J, Coulam CB: New concepts in ovarian regulation: An immune insight. Am J Reprod Immunol 1992;27:136–144PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Wasson NW, Coy EA, Kooistra JB, Yonginger JW: Seminal plasma immunosuppressive factors in the spouse of a woman with seminal fluid allergy. Am J Reprod Immunol 1987;15:99–100Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    James K, Hargreave TB: Immunosuppression by seminal plasma and its possible clinical significance. Immunol Today 1984;5:357–363Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    O'Bryan MK, Baker HWG, Saunders JR, Kirszbaum L, Walker ID, Hudson P, Liu DY, Glew MD, d'Apice AJF, Murphy BF: Human seminal clustrin (SP-40-40) localization and characterization. J Clin Invest 1990;85:1477–1486PubMedGoogle Scholar
  6. 6.
    Vanderpuye OA, Labarrere CA, McIntyre JA: The complement system in human reproduction. Am J Reprod Immunol 1992;27:145–155PubMedGoogle Scholar
  7. 7.
    Rooney IA, Oglesby TJ, Atkinson JP: Complement in human reproduction: activation and control. Immunol Res 1993;12:276–294PubMedGoogle Scholar
  8. 8.
    Anderson DJ, Abbott AF, Jack RM: The role of complement component C3b and its receptors in sperm-oocyte interaction. Proc Natl Acad Sci USA 1993;90:10051–10055PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Hasty LA, Brockman WW, Lambris JD, Lyttle CR: Hormonal regulation of complement factor B in human endometrium. Am J Reprod Immunol 1993;30:63–67PubMedGoogle Scholar
  10. 10.
    Tesarik J: Comparison of acrosome reaction-inducing activities of human cumulus oophorus, follicular fluid and ionophore A23187 in human sperm populations of proven fertilization ability in vitro. J Reprod Fertil 1985;74:383–388PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Fakih H, Vijayakumai R: Improved pregnancy rates and outcome with gamete intrafallopian transfer when follicular fluid is used as a sperm capacitation and gamete transfer medium. Fertil Steril 1990;53:515–527PubMedGoogle Scholar
  12. 12.
    Barak Y, Lessing JB, Amit A, Kogosowski A, Yovel I, David MP, Peyser MR: The development of an efficient ambulatory in vitro fertilization and embryo transfer program (ET) using ultrasonically-guided oocyte retrieval. Acta Obstet Gynecol Scand 1988;67:585–588PubMedGoogle Scholar
  13. 13.
    Nagy Z, Liu J, Cecile J, Silber S, Devroey P, van Steirtegheim A: Using ejaculated, fresh and frozen-thawed epididymal and testicular spermatozoa gives rise to comparable results after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. Fertil Steril 1995;63:808–819PubMedGoogle Scholar
  14. 14.
    World Health Organization Laboratory Manual for Examination of Human Semen. Cambridge, Cambridge University Press, 1987Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    Price RJ, Roberts TK, Green D, Boetteher B: Anticomplementary activity in human semen and its possible importance in reproduction. Am J Reprod Immunol 1984;6:92–93PubMedGoogle Scholar
  16. 16.
    Norusis MJ: SPSS-X Advanced Statistical Guide. Chicago, McGraw-Hill, 1985Google Scholar
  17. 17.
    Siegel S: Nonparametric Statistics for the Behavior Sciences. New York, Chicago, McGraw-Hill, 1956Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Natalia Zabludovsky
    • 1
  • Yona Barak
    • 2
  • Benjamin Bartoov
    • 1
  • Tamar Lublin-Tennenbaum
    • 1
  • Fina Eltes
    • 1
  • Ami Amit
    • 2
  • Abraham Kogosowski
    • 2
  1. 1.Male Fertility Laboratory, Department of Life SciencesBar-Ilan UniversityRamat-GanIsrael
  2. 2.IVF Unit, Herzliya Medical CenterHerzliyaon-SeaIsrael

Personalised recommendations