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Mycopathologia et mycologia applicata

, Volume 46, Issue 4, pp 379–385 | Cite as

Rhizosphere soil fungi of some vegetable plants

  • Brij Rani Mehrotra
  • R. K. Kakkar
Article

Summary

The fungi from the rhizosphere and non-rhizosphere soils of some important vegetable crop plants, viz.,Lycopersicon esculentum, Allium cepa, Trigonella foenum-graecum, Daucus carota, Hibiscus esculentus, Raphanus sativus, andBrassica oleradcea were isolated. Some members of Phycomycetes, Acsomycetes and Fungi Imperfecti were isolated.

It has also been observed that the pH in the region of the rhizosphere was lower and the moisture content was higher than in the soil away from it. Further, the maximum number of fungi was found in the rhizosphere of young plants. The present studies also supported the view that the number of fungi in the rhizosphere is greater than in the soil away from it. The largest number of fungi was obtained from the rhizosphere ofTrigonella foenum-graecum.

Keywords

Crop Plant Rhizosphere Soil Vegetable Crop Lycopersicon Esculentum Young Plant 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk N. V. 1972

Authors and Affiliations

  • Brij Rani Mehrotra
    • 1
  • R. K. Kakkar
    • 1
  1. 1.Allahabad-3India

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