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Relationship between blood plasma prostaglandin E2 and liver and lung metastases in colorectal cancer

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Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

Abstract

The relationship of prostaglandin E 2,of which a large amount is produced in various neoplasms, and hematogenous distant metastases was investigated in a total of 44 colorectal cancer patients because of its varied pathophysiologic potentials. The authors found significantly high levels of PGE 2 in local venous blood draining the carcinoma and in peripheral blood in cases with liver or lung metastasis, as well as a significantly large amount of PGE 2 production in the carcinoma tissue. The results suggest that increased local blood PGE 2 could enhance the metastasis formation, and increased peripheral blood PGE 2 may be useful in the detection of such metastasis in colorectal cancer.

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Supported in part by a Grant-in-Aid for Cancer Research from the Ministry of Health and Welfare, Japan.

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Narisawa, T., Kusaka, H., Yamazaki, Y. et al. Relationship between blood plasma prostaglandin E2 and liver and lung metastases in colorectal cancer. Dis Colon Rectum 33, 840–845 (1990). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02051919

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  • DOI: https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02051919

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