Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

, Volume 37, Issue 6, pp 590–594 | Cite as

Effect of electrostimulation on sphincter function in neurogenic fecal continence

  • Mariska Scheuer
  • Han C. Kuijpers
  • Gijs Bleijenberg
Original Contributions
  • 28 Downloads

Abstract

PURPOSE: This study was designed to examine the effects of electrostimulation on sphincter function. METHODS: Electric stimulation was performed twice a day for 30 minutes over a 12-week period on 10 patients with neurogenic fecal incontinence. Anal manometry was repeated after 6 and 12 weeks. RESULTS: Two patients experienced some improvement. Mean resting pressure was increased by 0.6 (−5.8 to +5.3) kPa and mean squeezing pressure by 0.3 (−1.6 to +2.6) kPa. All values remained below continent levels. An increase in squeezing pressure after both 6 and 12 weeks was recorded in only one patient. CONCLUSION: Electrostimulation does not improve internal or external sphincter function. There is no indication that it will do so in the long term either.

Key words

Fecal incontinence Electric stimulation Anal manometry 

Preview

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

Unable to display preview. Download preview PDF.

References

  1. 1.
    Rowedder K. Electrostimulation therapy for anal incontinence. Coloproctology 1984;6:178–9.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Kuijpers JH, Scheuer M. Disorders of fecal retention: a clinical and manometric study. Dis Colon Rectum 1990;33:207–11.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.
    Caldwell KP. A new treatment of rectal prolapse. J R Soc Med 1965;58:792–4.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Hopkinson BR, Lightwood R. Electrical treatment of anal incontinence. Lancet 1966;1:297.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  5. 5.
    Restauration of anal sphincter tone by electronic implant. In: Goligher JC, Duthie HL, Nixon HH, eds. Surgery of the anus rectum and colon. London: Bailliere Tindall, 1975:306.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    Knoch HG. Conservative treatment of partial anal incontinence. Coloproctology 1986;8:181–3.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    Larpent JL, Cuer JC, Da Poigny M. Clinical and manometric results of electrical stimulation in patients with anal incontinence. Coloproctology 1987;9:183–4.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Pescatori M, Pavesio R, Anastasio G, Daini S. Transanal electrostimulation for fecal incontinence: clinical, psychologic and manometric prospective study. Dis Colon Rectum 1991;34:540–5.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  9. 9.
    Duthie HL, Electrical stimulation. In: Irvine WT, ed. Modem trends in surgery-3. London: Butterworths, 1971:102–4.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Jacobs PP, Scheuer M, Kuijpers JH, Vingerhoets MH. Obstetric fecal incontinence: role of pelvic floor denervation and results of delayed sphincter repair. Dis Colon Rectum 1990;33:494–7.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  11. 11.
    Scheuer M, Kuijpers JH. Postanal repair restores anatomy rather than function. Dis Colon Rectum 1989;32:960–3.PubMedGoogle Scholar

References

  1. 1.a
    Rowedder K. Electrostimulation therapy for anal incontinence. Coloproctology 1984;6:178–9.Google Scholar
  2. 2.a
    Scheuer M, Kuijpers HC. Effect of electrostimulation on sphincter function in neurogenic fecal incontinence. Dis Colon Rectum 1994;37:590–4.PubMedGoogle Scholar
  3. 3.a
    Kuijpers JH, Scheuer M. Disorders of fecal retention: a clinical and manometric study. Dis Colon Rectum 1990;33:207–11.PubMedGoogle Scholar

Copyright information

© American Society of Colon and Rectal Surgeons 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Mariska Scheuer
    • 1
  • Han C. Kuijpers
    • 1
  • Gijs Bleijenberg
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of SurgeryUniversity Hospital NijmegenHB NijmegenThe Netherlands

Personalised recommendations