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Intraoperative use of toradol® facilitates outpatient hemorrhoidectomy

  • Original Contributions
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Diseases of the Colon & Rectum

Abstract

Pain after hemorrhoidectomy is widely feared by many patients who are mostly still treated with oral/intramuscular narcotics to control their pain postoperatively. PURPOSE: In an effort to decrease posthemorrhoidectomy pain by applying newer methods of analgesia, a prospective trial was conducted to investigate the postoperative analgesic effect of Toradol® (ketorolac tromethamine; Syntex Labs, Palo Alto, CA) injected into the sphincter muscle at the time of hemorrhoidectomy and taken orally during a five-day postoperative period in a group of 24 patients (Toradol® group). Results were compared with two other groups of matching patients: one group (narcotics, n=18) treated with standard postoperative narcotic intramuscular/oral analgesics after overnight hospital stay, and a group (SQMP, n=21) previously treated by one of us with outpatient, subcutaneous infusion of morphine sulfate (Roxane Laboratories, Columbus, OH) via a home infusion pump. METHOD: The length of hospitalization, severity of postoperative pain and complications, costs, and side effects were analyzed by patient questionnaire at the time of the first postoperative visit and hospital and clinic records were reviewed. Differences between groups were analyzed using Student's t-test withP<0.05 being significant. RESULTS: Subjective pain response and hospitalization cost were significantly less in the SQMP group; however, this was at the expense of increased postoperative complications (urinary retention) and side effects (day until first bowel movement, nausea) although without a decrease in satisfaction rating. The Toradol® group had pain control equivalent to that of the narcotics group, a higher satisfaction rating, and suffered no increase in complications relative to either group. Significantly, there was no urinary retention in the Toradol® group. CONCLUSION: Postoperative pain after hemorrhoidectomy can be safely controlled as an outpatient using newer methods of pain control. These include both constant-infusion pain pump or supplemental use of the nonsteroidal analgesic ketorolac, both of which allow early release of the patient the day of surgery by diminishing postoperative pain. An important advantage of local injection of ketorolac is the elimination of urinary retention in our study group, probably by blunting the pain reflex response facilitated by prostaglandins, thus allowing safe same-day discharge.

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O'Donovan, S., Ferrara, A., Larach, S. et al. Intraoperative use of toradol® facilitates outpatient hemorrhoidectomy. Dis Colon Rectum 37, 793–799 (1994). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02050144

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