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Mycopathologia et mycologia applicata

, Volume 54, Issue 4, pp 541–548 | Cite as

A preliminary chemical and physical comparison of blackbird-starling roost soils which do or do not contain Histoplasma capsulatum

  • Larry K. Vining
  • Robert J. Weeks
Article

Abstract

The soil from each of seventeen blackbird-starling roosts, nine positive and eight negative for the presence ofHistoplasma capsulatum, was tested for phosphorus, nitrogen, organic matter, water-holding capacity (WHC), and soil pH (in water). When the test results for the positive and negative groups were compared, a significant difference was found for every test except soil pH.

Keywords

Nitrogen Organic Matter Phosphorus Negative Group Histoplasma Capsulatum 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Dr. W. Junk B. V. 1974

Authors and Affiliations

  • Larry K. Vining
    • 1
  • Robert J. Weeks
    • 1
  1. 1.EIP, CDCKansas City

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