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Journal of Chemical Ecology

, Volume 21, Issue 2, pp 143–167 | Cite as

Pheromones in white pine cone beetle,Conophthorus coniperda (schwarz) (Coleoptera: Scolytidae)

  • Göran Birgersson
  • Gary L. Debarr
  • Peter de Groot
  • Mark J. Dalusky
  • Harold D. PierceJr.
  • John H. Borden
  • Holger Meyer
  • Wittko Francke
  • Karl E. Espelie
  • C. Wayne Berisford
Article

Abstract

Female white pine cone beetles,Conophthorus coniperda, attacking second-year cones of eastern white pine,Pinus strobus L., produced a sex-specific pheromone that attracted conspecific males in laboratory bioassays and to field traps. Beetle response was enhanced by host monoterpenes. The female-produced compound was identified in volatiles collected on Porapak Q and in hindgut extracts as (+)-trans-pityol, (2R,5S)-(+)-2-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-5-methyltetrahydrofuran. Males and females produced and released the (E)-(-)-spiroacetal, (5S,7S)-(-)-7-methyl-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane, which was not an attractant for either sex, but acted as a repellent for males. Porapak Q-trapped volatiles from both sexes contained (+)-trans-pinocarveol and (-)-myrtenol. In addition, hindgut extracts of females containedtrans-verbenol, while males had pinocarvone and verbenone. Work in Georgia and Canada confirmed that the same isomers of pityol and spiroacetal are present in two distinct and widely separated populations ofC. coniperda.

Key words

Conophthorus coniperda white pine cone beetle Scolytidae pheromone pityol 2-(1-hydroxy-1-methylethyl)-5-methyltetrahydrofuran (E)-7-methyl-1,6-dioxaspiro[4.5]decane spiroacetal chiral analysis walking bioassay traps 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1995

Authors and Affiliations

  • Göran Birgersson
    • 1
  • Gary L. Debarr
    • 2
  • Peter de Groot
    • 3
    • 4
  • Mark J. Dalusky
    • 1
  • Harold D. PierceJr.
    • 5
  • John H. Borden
    • 4
  • Holger Meyer
    • 6
  • Wittko Francke
    • 6
  • Karl E. Espelie
    • 1
  • C. Wayne Berisford
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EntomologyUniversity of GeorgiaAthens
  2. 2.Forestry Sciences LaboratoryUSDA Forest Service, Southeastern Forest Experiment StationAthens
  3. 3.Canadian Forest ServiceForest Pest Management InstituteSault Ste. MarieCanada
  4. 4.Centre for Pest Management, Department of Biological SciencesSimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  5. 5.Department of ChemistrySimon Fraser UniversityBurnabyCanada
  6. 6.Department of Organic ChemistryUniversität HamburgHamburgGermany

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