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Neohelicon

, Volume 19, Issue 1, pp 267–282 | Cite as

Language as sensation: The use of poetic and evocative language in five African autobiographies

  • Tony E. Afejuku
Diversa
  • 41 Downloads

Keywords

Comparative Literature Evocative Language 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Literatur

  1. 1.
    Camara Laye,The African Child, trans. James Kirkup (London: Fontana, 1955). All page references to the text refer to this edition.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Wole Soyinka,Ake: The Years of Childhood (London: Rex Collings, 1981). All page references to the text refer to this edition.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    R. Mugo Gatheru,Child of Two Worlds (1964; rpt. London: Heinemann, 1975). All page references to the text refer to this edition.Google Scholar
  4. 4.
    Ezekiel Mphahlele,Down Second Avenue (1959; rpt. London: Faber and Faber, 1973). All page references to the text refer to this edition.Google Scholar
  5. 5.
    Peter Abrahams,Tell Freedom (1954; rpt. London: Faber and Faber, 1981). All page references to the text refer to this edition.Google Scholar
  6. 6.
    I made this remark in a forth-coming essay inThe Literary Griot.Google Scholar
  7. 7.
    For a similar view on this, see Adele King,The Writings of Camara Laye (London: Heinemann, n.d.), p. 35.Google Scholar
  8. 8.
    Camara Laye,L'Enfant Noir (Paris: Plon, 1972), p. 145.Google Scholar
  9. 9.
    See Gerald Moore,Twelve African Writers (London: Hutchinson and Co. Publishers Ltd., 1980), p. 47.Google Scholar
  10. 10.
    Longinus, “On the Sublime” inClassical Literary Criticism, trans. T. S. Dorsch (1969; rpt. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1975), p. 108.Google Scholar
  11. 11.
    Romanus Egudu,The Study of Poetry (Oxford: Oxford University Press, 1977), pp. 11–12.Google Scholar
  12. 12.
    Rene Wellek and Austin Warren,Theory of Literature (1942; rpt. Harmondsworth: Penguin, 1980), p. 24.Google Scholar
  13. 13.
    See, for instance, ‘Niyi Osundare, “Words of Iron, Sentences of Thunder: Soyinka's Prose Style”,African Literature Today, 13 (1983), pp. 24–37; also see Ossie Onuora Enekwe, “Wole Soyinka as a Novelist”,Okike No. 9 (1975), pp. 72–86.Google Scholar
  14. 14.
    Emmanuel Obiechina,Culture, Tradition and Society in the West African Novel (1975; rpt. Cambridge University Press, 1980), p. 174.Google Scholar
  15. 15.
    These words and the idea they express are borrowed from Chinweizu, Onwuchekwa Jemie and Ihechukwu Madubuike who applied them to Senghor. See theirToward the Decolonization of African Literature: African Fiction and Poetry and Their Critics. Vol. 1 (Enugu: Fourth Dimension Publishing Co. Ltd., 1980), p. 282.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó 1992

Authors and Affiliations

  • Tony E. Afejuku

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