The Journal of Membrane Biology

, Volume 40, Supplement 1, pp 247–260 | Cite as

Epithelial cell electrolytes in relation to transepithelial sodium transport across toad urinary bladder

  • Anthony D. C. Macknight
  • Alexander Leaf
Article

Summary

Aspects of the relationships between cellular composition and transepithelial sodium transport across toad urinary bladder are reviewed. Changes in cellular sodium produced by amiloride, vasopressin, aldosterone, hypoxia, ouabain, and sodium-free media are consistent with a cellular sodium transport pool. Metabolic studies suggest that this pool gains its sodium from the mucosal medium and that there is little recycling of sodium between cell and serosal medium. One-third of the cellular potassium equilibrates readily with serosal potassium. The rate of exchange of potassium is much less than the rate of sodium transport supporting the contention that sodium transport in this tissue is electrogenic. Studies with36Cl suggest that chloride does not cross the apical cellular membranes, but exchanges with serosal chloride. Possible relationships between transepithelial sodium transport and cellular volume regulation are discussed.

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag New York Inc 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • Anthony D. C. Macknight
    • 1
    • 2
  • Alexander Leaf
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of Otago Medical SchoolDunedinNew Zealand
  2. 2.Department of MedicineMassachusetts General Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBoston

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