Cardiovascular Drugs and Therapy

, Volume 4, Supplement 5, pp 987–990 | Cite as

Effect of nifedipine administration on pulse wave velocity (PWV) of chronic hemodialysis patients—2-year trial

  • Yasushi Saito
  • Kohji Shirai
  • Junji Uchino
  • Masayuki Okazawa
  • Yoshihiro Hattori
  • Toyohiko Yoshida
  • Sho Yoshida
Nifedipine: Renal Effects

Summary

Pulse wave velocity (PWV) is known to reflect the stiffness of the aorta [2,7], one of the major features of atherosclerosis. To clarify the severity and progression mechanism of atherosclerosis in hemodialysis patients and the preventive effect of nifedipine, PWV was annually measured for 2 years, and the change of PWV and contributory factors were analyzed. PWV in hemodialysis patients was faster than in age-matched normal controls. PWV was correlated with the duration of hemodialysis. ΔPWV, which is obtained from the difference in PWV over 1 year, was positively correlated with age, high blood pressure, and serum cholesterol levels and was negatively correlated with HDL levels. The Ca×Pi value was also positively correlated with ΔPWV. Nifedipine was administered to 47 patients for 2 years, and the change of PWV was compared with age-matched control hemodialysis patients. The PWV of the control group was gradually increased by 10%. The PWV of the group given nifedipine decreased by 2%. These results suggested that administration of nifedipine may prevent the progression of PWV in hemodialysis patients and may decrease the progression of atherosclerosis.

Key Words

pulse wave velocity nifedipine atherosclerosis hemodialysis 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • Yasushi Saito
    • 1
  • Kohji Shirai
    • 1
  • Junji Uchino
    • 1
  • Masayuki Okazawa
    • 1
  • Yoshihiro Hattori
    • 2
  • Toyohiko Yoshida
    • 2
  • Sho Yoshida
    • 1
  1. 1.Second Department of Internal MedicineChiba University School of MedicineChibaJapan
  2. 2.Keiyo Hemodialysis CenterChibaJapan

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