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Scientometrics

, Volume 30, Issue 1, pp 243–258 | Cite as

Studying leadership and subdisciplinary structure of scientific disciplines

Cluster analysis of participation in Scientific Meetings
  • T. Söderqvist
  • A. M. Silverstein
Article

Abstract

A new method for the analysis of leadership and subdisciplinary structure of a scientific discipline is discussed. The database consists of lists of participants in international scientific meetings. Disciplinary leaders are identified by means of their frequency of participation. The subdisciplinary structure is mapped by means of cluster analysis of meetings with respect to degree of similarily. The method possesses strengths not shared by citation analysis: in addition to scientists frequently cited in the literature for their contribution to cognitive research programs, it also identifies administrative discipline builders. The method may also represent better the cognitive interests of scientists.

Keywords

Cluster Analysis Research Program Scientific Discipline Citation Analysis Scientific Meeting 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Notes and comments

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Copyright information

© Akadémiai Kiadó 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Söderqvist
    • 1
    • 3
  • A. M. Silverstein
    • 2
  1. 1.Unit of History of Science, Department of Life SciencesRoskilde UniversityRoskilde(Denmark)
  2. 2.Department of Theory of Science and ResearchGöteborg UniversityGöteborg(Sweden)
  3. 3.Institute of the History of MedicineThe Johns Hopkins UniversityBaltimore(USA)

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