Calcified Tissue Research

, Volume 23, Issue 1, pp 77–81 | Cite as

Pentose-shunt oxidation in the periosteal cells in healing fractures

  • Jane Dunham
  • R. G. Shedden
  • A. Catterall
  • Lucille Bitensky
  • J. Chayen
Article

Summary

The activity of pentose-shunt dehydrogenases is very low in periosteal cells of normal rat metatarsals, but increases one day post-fracture and rises linearly over the next two days. By four days postfracture, the distribution of this activity along the bone shows two centres of high activity: the first in the region of proliferation to form callus and the second at the site where new bone is first seen, one day later. The high rate of generation of NADPH would be expected to reduce glutathione; reduced glutathione has been shown to inhibit alkaline phosphatase activity in these cells.

Key words

Fracture Healing Glucose 6-phosphate Dehydrogenase Glutathione Microdensitometry Cytochemistry 

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References

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1977

Authors and Affiliations

  • Jane Dunham
    • 2
  • R. G. Shedden
    • 1
  • A. Catterall
    • 1
  • Lucille Bitensky
    • 2
  • J. Chayen
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Orthopaedic SurgeryNew Charing Cross HospitalLondon
  2. 2.Division of Cellular BiologyKennedy Institute of RheumatologyLondonUK

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