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Utilization of surface localized substrate by non-adhesive marine bacteria

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Abstract

Thirty-four marine bacteria were isolated from the eluate of seawater passed through a column of glass beads coated with stearic acid. Irreversible attachment of these isolates to stearic acid-coated glass surfaces ranged from 7.6–100% of the total attached population, with 7 isolates exhibiting less than 10% irreversible adhesion. All 14 isolates tested were able to utilize surface bound14C-stearic acid, even though some showed mostly reversible adhesion to the surface. More detailed studies were made comparing the reversibly adheringVibrio MH3 with the irreversibly adheringPseudomonas NCMB2021. MH3 cells were readily removed from the surface by a gentle shear force, and a significant degree of14C-labeling of MH3 cells, but not of NCMB2021 cells, in the bulk phase was observed. The ecological significance of nutrient scavenging at solid surfaces by reversibly attached bacteria is considered.

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Hermansson, M., Marshall, K.C. Utilization of surface localized substrate by non-adhesive marine bacteria. Microb Ecol 11, 91–105 (1985). https://doi.org/10.1007/BF02010482

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