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Experientia

, Volume 36, Issue 1, pp 116–118 | Cite as

Hypophysectomy exerts a radioprotective effect on frog lens

  • J. H. Hayden
  • H. Rothstein
  • B. V. Worgul
  • G. R. MerriamJr
Specialia

Summary

Exposure to X-rays usually causes cataracts in frogs. These cataracts are always preceded by misalignment of the structures called meridional rows (MR). When cell division is completely halted by hypophysectomy, however, irradiation no longer disturbs the orientation of the MR. Since the MR are the structures formed as lens epithelial cells differentiate into lens fibres it is reasonable to propose that radiocataractogenesis depends upon a mitosis-driven formation of pathological fibres from epithelial cells that have been rendered abnormal by exposure to X-rays.

Keywords

Epithelial Cell Cell Division Cataract Lens Epithelial Cell Lens Fibre 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1980

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. H. Hayden
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Rothstein
    • 1
    • 2
  • B. V. Worgul
    • 1
    • 2
  • G. R. MerriamJr
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Kresge Eye Institute of Wayne State UniversityDetroitUSA
  2. 2.Department of OphthalmologyColumbia University College of Physicians and SurgeonsNew YorkUSA

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