Antibacterial activity of sucralfate againstEscherichia coli, Staphylococcus aureus andPseudomonas aeruginosa in batch and continuous culture

  • A. P. West
  • S. Abdul
  • M. J. Sherratt
  • T. J. J. Inglis
Notes

Abstract

The antibacterial effect of varying concentrations of sucralfate was studied onEscherichia coli, Pseudomonas aeruginosa andStaphylococcus aureus grown in both agitated batch and continuous culture. The minimum inhibitory concentrations estimated with the two methods were in close agreement, ranging from 5 to 15 mg sucralfate/ml, concentrations easily attainable in gastric juice after a standard adult dose. Batch culture results indicated a dose-dependent effect. This study provides further evidence for an antibacterial effect by sucralfate against a range of species associated with respiratory tract infection in ventilated patients.

Keywords

Antibacterial Activity Respiratory Tract Minimum Inhibitory Concentration Staphylococcus Aureus Respiratory Tract Infection 

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • A. P. West
    • 1
  • S. Abdul
    • 1
  • M. J. Sherratt
    • 1
  • T. J. J. Inglis
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of LeedsLeedsUK
  2. 2.Department of Microbiology, Faculty of MedicineNational University of SingaporeSingapore

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