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, Volume 34, Issue 1–2, pp 239–241 | Cite as

Lactobacillus casei-induced polyarthritis in Lewis rats: Histopathological scoring system for evaluation of anti-rheumatic drugs

  • E. M. O'Byrne
  • E. D. Roberts
  • A. S. Rubin
  • V. Blancuzzi
  • D. Wilson
  • N. R. Hall
  • T. J. A. Lehman
Animal Models

Abstract

A histopathological scoring system which grades drug effects on cellular infiltration, pannus formation, cartilage degradation and bone resorption inL. casei-induced polyarthritis in rats is described. Reference anti-rheumatic and anti-inflammatory agents administered on days 2–60 after induction of arthritis were evaluated for effects on paw swelling weekly and graded histopathologic changes on day 60. This animal model affords a tool to evaluated therapeutic agents on the joint destruction resulting from chronic inflammation.

Keywords

Arthritis Animal Model Lactobacillus Bone Resorption Therapeutic Agent 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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References

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. M. O'Byrne
    • 1
  • E. D. Roberts
    • 2
  • A. S. Rubin
    • 1
  • V. Blancuzzi
    • 1
  • D. Wilson
    • 1
  • N. R. Hall
    • 1
  • T. J. A. Lehman
    • 3
  1. 1.Pharmaceutical Division, Research DepartmentCIBA-GEIGY CorporationSummitUSA
  2. 2.Delta Regional Primate Research CenterCovingtonUSA
  3. 3.The Hospital for Special SurgeryCornell University Medical CollegeNew YorkUSA

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