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, Volume 33, Issue 1–2, pp 218–220 | Cite as

Evaluation of mast cell activation (tryptase) in two patients suffering from drug-induced hypotensoid reactions

  • P. Matsson
  • I. Enander
  • A. -S. Andersson
  • J. Nystrand
  • L. Schwartz
  • J. Watkins
Histamine and Clinical Studies

Abstract

Tryptase is predominantly found in mast cells, where it resides in secretory granules, and is released with other mediators during mast cell degranulation. By using a newly developed commercial assay for measurements of tryptase levels we have investigated two cases of suspected drug-induced anaphylaxis. Each patient had a similar clinical presentation, consisting of hypotension and cyanosis after administration of thiopentone and suxamethonium. One of the patients showed a highly elevated serum level of tryptase reaching 26 μg/l 30 min after the initial reaction. In addition, slightly elevated levels of specific IgE antibodies to thiopentone were detected. The other patient with similar symptoms showed no increase in the level of tryptase, nor any specific IgE to thiopentone or suxamethonium. These data indicate the patient I suffered from true anaphylaxis, whereas the reaction of patient II occurred by a different mechanism.

Keywords

Mast Cell Cell Activation Elevated Serum Secretory Granule Initial Reaction 

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • P. Matsson
    • 1
  • I. Enander
    • 1
  • A. -S. Andersson
    • 1
  • J. Nystrand
    • 1
  • L. Schwartz
    • 2
  • J. Watkins
    • 3
  1. 1.Pharmacia Diagnostics ABUppsalaSweden
  2. 2.Dept. of MedicineVirginia Commonwealth UnivRichmondUSA
  3. 3.Dept of ImmunologyRoyal Hallamshire HospitalSheffieldUK

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