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, Volume 16, Issue 3–4, pp 215–218 | Cite as

Effects of three histaminergic compounds on function and oxygen consumption of isolated guinea-pig hearts

  • Bernhard Permanetter
  • Gert Baumann
  • Jochen Dörner
  • Walter Schunack
  • Hans Blömer
Histamine and Cardio-Vascular System

Abstract

First experiences in man indicate, that even in catecholamine-insensitive congestive cardiomyopathy a considerable improvement of myocardial function can be attained by the H2-receptor agonist impromidine. In an isolated, pressure-volume work performing guinea-pig heart preparation cardiac effects of three histaminergic compounds (Nα,5-dimethylhistamine (HCl)2, 5-ethyl-Nα-methyl-histamine (HCl)2,Nα,Nα-dimethyl-histamine (HCl)2) were examined. Influences on function and myocardial oxygen consumption were compared to those obtained by impromidine.

Dose-response curves for the histamine derivatives were 1.7–2.5 orders of magnitude right of the impromidine curves. Maximal inotropic stimulation was greater forNα,5-dimethyl-histamine (HCl)2 than for impromidine. All compounds exhibited a high chronotropic effect and, at high concentrations, a net coronary dilating effect.

Keywords

Histamine Cardiomyopathy Oxygen Consumption Considerable Improvement Myocardial Function 

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1985

Authors and Affiliations

  • Bernhard Permanetter
    • 1
  • Gert Baumann
    • 1
  • Jochen Dörner
    • 1
  • Walter Schunack
    • 1
  • Hans Blömer
    • 1
  1. 1.1st Department of Medicine, Division Cardiology and CirculationTechnical University of MunichFRG

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