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Breast Cancer Research and Treatment

, Volume 18, Issue 2, pp 99–110 | Cite as

C-13 NMR spectroscopy of plasma reduces interference of hypertriglyceridemia in the H-1 NMR detection of malignancy. Application in patients with breast lesions

  • E. T. Fossel
  • F. M. Hall
  • J. McDonagh
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Summary

We have previously described the application of water-suppressed proton nuclear magnetic resonance (H-1 NMR) spectroscopy of plasma for detection of malignancy. Subsequently, hypertriglyceridemia has been identified as a source of false positive results. We now describe a confirmatory, adjunctive technique — analysis of the carbon-13 (C-13) NMR spectrum of plasma — which also identifies the presence of malignancy but is not sensitive to the plasma triglyceride level. Blinded plasma samples from 480 normal donors and 208 patients scheduled for breast biopsy were analyzed by water-suppressed H-1 and C-13 NMR spectroscopy. Triglyceride levels were also measured. Among the normal donors, there were 38 individuals with hypertriglyceridemia of whom 18 had results consistent with malignancy by H-1 NMR spectroscopy. However, the C-13 technique reduced the apparent H-1 false positive rate from 7.0% to 0.6%. Similarly, in the breast biopsy cohort, C-13 reduced the false positive rate from 2.8% to 0.9%. Furthermore, the accuracy of the combined H-1/C-13 test in this blinded study was greater than 96% in 208 patients studied.

Key words

cancer detection proton NMR spectroscopy C-13 NMR spectroscopy breast lesions 

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Copyright information

© Kluwer Academic Publishers 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. T. Fossel
    • 1
  • F. M. Hall
    • 1
  • J. McDonagh
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Radiology, Charles A. Dana Research InstituteBeth Israel HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Department of Pathology, Charles A. Dana Research InstituteBeth Israel Hospital and Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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