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Transgenic Research

, Volume 3, Issue 1, pp 3–12 | Cite as

Opportunities for manipulating the seed protein composition of wheat and barley in order to improve quality

  • Peter R. Shewry
  • Arthur S. Tatham
  • Nigel G. Halford
  • Jackie H. A. Barker
  • Ulrich Hannappel
  • P. Gallois
  • M. Thomas
  • Martin Kreis
Review

Abstract

Wheat and barley are the major temperate cereals, being used for food, feed and industrial raw material. However, in all cases the quality may be limited by the amount, composition and properties of the grain storage proteins. We describe how a combination of biochemical and molecular studies has led to an understanding of the molecular basis for breadmaking quality in wheat and feed quality in barley, and also provided genes encoding key proteins that determine quality. The control of expression of these genes has been studied in transgenic tobacco plants and by transient expression in cereal protoplasts, providing the basis for the production of transgenic cereals with improved quality characteristics.

Keywords

Wheat barley gluten proteins chymotrypsin inhibitors nutritional quality breadmaking quality 

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Copyright information

© Chapman & Hall 1994

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter R. Shewry
    • 1
  • Arthur S. Tatham
    • 1
  • Nigel G. Halford
    • 1
  • Jackie H. A. Barker
    • 1
  • Ulrich Hannappel
    • 1
    • 4
  • P. Gallois
    • 3
  • M. Thomas
    • 2
  • Martin Kreis
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Agricultural Sciences, University of Bristol, AFRC Institute of Arable Crops ResearchLong Ashton Research StationBristolUK
  2. 2.Biologie du Developpement des PlantesUniversité de Paris-SudOrsay CedexFrance
  3. 3.Laboratoire de Physiologie et Biologie Moléculaire VégétalesUniversité de PerpignanPerpignan CedexFrance
  4. 4.Institute of Plant Genetics and Crop Plant ResearchGaterslebenGermany

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