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Pharmaceutisch Weekblad

, Volume 8, Issue 1, pp 60–62 | Cite as

Quinolones in the treatment of gonorrhoea and Chlamydia trachomatis infections

  • E. Stolz
  • M. J. A. M. Tegelberg-Stassen
  • A. H. Van der Willigen
  • J. C. S. Van der Hoek
  • Th. Van Joost
  • L. Mooi
  • J. H. T. Wagenvoort
Quinolones in Perspective

Abstract

123 Female patients suffering from uncomplicated urogenital gonorrhoea were treated with either 200 mg or 400 mg enoxacin. The cure rate in the 400 mg group was 100%; the cure rate in the 200 mg group was 95,7%. 212 Male patients suffering from urethral gonorrhoea were treated with either 250 mg or 500 mg ciprofloxacin (one tablet). Cure rates in both groups were 100%. Post-gonococcal urethritis was observed in 31 out of 85 (36%) patients in the first, and 21 out of 79 (27%) in the second group. In a pilot study 42 male patients suffering from non-gonococcal urethritis were treated during one week with 1 g ciprofloxacin daily. In 22 patientsChlamydia trachomatis was isolated from the urethra; in 20 of these 22 casesChlamydia trachomatis could not be cultured after- treatment (cure rate 91%), but in 4 of these 20 cases (20%) and in 8 of the 20Chlamydia trachomatis negative cases (40%) urine-sediment abnormalities were present after treatment.

Key words

Chlamydia trachomatis Ciprofloxacin Drug evaluation Enoxacin Gonorrhea Side effects Urethritis 

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References

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Copyright information

© Royal Dutch Association for Advancement of Pharmacy 1986

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Stolz
    • 1
  • M. J. A. M. Tegelberg-Stassen
    • 1
  • A. H. Van der Willigen
    • 1
  • J. C. S. Van der Hoek
    • 1
  • Th. Van Joost
    • 1
  • L. Mooi
    • 2
  • J. H. T. Wagenvoort
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Dermatology and VenereologyUniversity Hospital Rotterdam-DijkzigtGD RotterdamThe Netherlands
  2. 2.Department of Clinical Microbiology and Antimicrobial TherapyUniversity Hospital Rotterdam-DijkzigtGD RotterdamThe Netherlands

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