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Ceftibuten (7432-S, SCH 39720): Comparative antimicrobial activity against 4735 clinical isolates, beta-lactamase stability and broth microdilution quality control guidelines

  • R. N. Jones
  • A. L. Barry
  • The Collaborative Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Group
New Antimicrobial Agents

Abstract

The antimicrobial activity of ceftibuten, a new oral cephalosporin, was evaluated using 4735 clinical bacterial isolates processed at four medical centers. Ceftibuten inhibited nearly 92 % of allEnterobacteriaceae (⩽ 8.0µg/ml), thereby being markedly superior to cefixime which inhibited 78.7 % at ⩽1.0µg/ml and cefuroxime which inhibited 45.1 % at ⩽2.0µg/ml. Pseudomonads and staphylococci were not within the spectrum of activity of ceftibuten. Ceftibuten was found to be very stable in the presence of five commonly occurring beta-lactamases of both the chromosomal-mediated (P99, K1) and plasmid-mediated (CARB-2, OXA-1, TEM-1) types. Only Type Ia (P99) beta-lactamase was significantly inhibited by ceftibuten. On the basis of results of a ceftibuten MIC quality control study conducted in five laboratories, a quality control range of 0.12 to 0.5µg/ml is recommended for theEscherichia coli ATCC 25922 strain.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Quality Control Antimicrobial Activity Cephalosporin Medical Center 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1988

Authors and Affiliations

  • R. N. Jones
    • 1
  • A. L. Barry
    • 1
  • The Collaborative Antimicrobial Susceptibility Testing Group
  1. 1.Clinical Microbiology InstituteTualatinUSA

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