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Anaerobic digestion: microbial and biochemical aspects of volatile acid production

  • J. L. Uribelarrea
  • A. Pareilleux
Environmental Microbiology

Summary

The production of organic acids has been tested with bacterial flora selected from a municipal sludge digestor. In order to elucidate the basic mechanisms by which glucose is converted to volatile fatty acids, the examination of non-methanogenic bacteria was attempted. Both lactate-producers and lactate-utilizers were found among these bacteria. When mixed isolates were used as the inoculum, the accumulation of lactic acid and its further conversion to propionic and butyric acids was demonstrated at a carbon conversion rate of about 0.75. It is therefore suggested that this metabolic sequence may occur as a normal process in acidogenic fermentation, which is the first step in anaerobic digestion.

Keywords

Fermentation Sludge Lactic Acid Conversion Rate Acid Production 
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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • J. L. Uribelarrea
    • 1
  • A. Pareilleux
    • 1
  1. 1.Département de Génie Biochimique et Alimentaire, ERA-CNRS no 879Institut National des Sciences AppliquéesToulouse CedexFrance

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