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In vitro activity of cefoperazone-sulbactam combinations against cefoperazone-resistant clinical bacterial isolates

  • G. M. Eliopoulos
  • K. Klimm
  • M. J. Ferraro
  • R. C. MoelleringJr.
Notes

Abstract

From July 1987 to January 1988, 452 cefoperazone-resistant bacterial isolates were identified among strains subjected to routine susceptibility testing in a clinical microbiology laboratory. The 452 isolates were tested for susceptibility to cefoperazone, sulbactam, and a 2:1 combination of these drugs by agar dilution techniques. The greatest benefit of the cefoperazone-sulbactam combination was noted againstBacteroides spp. andAcinetobacter spp. The combination demonstrated clinically significant synergism against approximately 20% of strains ofPseudomonas aeruginosa.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Agar Bacterial Isolate Susceptibility Testing Great Benefit 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. M. Eliopoulos
    • 1
    • 3
  • K. Klimm
    • 1
  • M. J. Ferraro
    • 2
    • 3
  • R. C. MoelleringJr.
    • 1
    • 3
  1. 1.Department of MedicineNew England Deaconess HospitalBostonUSA
  2. 2.Departments of Medicine and MicrobiologyMassachusetts General HospitalBostonUSA
  3. 3.Harvard Medical SchoolBostonUSA

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