Use of quinolones in treatment of prostatitis and lower urinary tract infections

  • V. T. Andriole
Review

Abstract

The newer quinolones, ciprofloxacin, enoxacin, fleroxacin, lomefloxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin are highly effective antimicrobial agents against the majority of bacteria responsible for urinary tract infections and bacterial prostatitis. The pharmacokinetic properties of these agents after oral administration result in high concentrations in human urine, as well as in prostatic fluid and prostatic tissue. Ciprofloxacin, enoxacin and lomefloxacin produce the highest concentrations in prostatic tissue, followed by norfloxacin, ofloxacin and fleroxacin. More than 400 patients with chronic bacterial prostatitis have been treated with one of the newer quinolones in varying doses for 10 to 84 days. The results indicate a cure rate of approximately 70 %, although the follow-up period is quite variable in these studies. Clinical trials of short-term (single dose vs three days) therapy with the newer quinolones conducted in women with uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections were reviewed. Although bacteriologic cure rates were high with single doses of ciprofloxacin, fleroxacin, norfloxacin, ofloxacin and pefloxacin, approximately one in five women with suspected uncomplicated lower urinary tract infection experience failure of single-dose therapy. In contrast, a three-day regimen with these agents is more effective than a single-dose in the treatment of uncomplicated lower urinary tract infections in women.

Keywords

Ofloxacin Quinolones Norfloxacin Prostatitis Prostatic Tissue 

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Copyright information

© Friedr, Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1991

Authors and Affiliations

  • V. T. Andriole
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Internal MedicineYale University School of MedicineNew HavenUSA

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