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Environmental justice: A louisiana case study

  • Daniel C. Wigley
  • Kristin Shrader-Frechette
Article

Abstract

The paper begins with a brief analysis of the concepts of environmental justice and environmental racism and classism. The authors argue that pollution- and environment-related decision-making is prima facie wrong whenever it results in inequitable treatment of individuals on the basis of race or socio-economic status. The essay next surveys the history of the doctrine of free informed consent and argues that the consent of those affected is necessary for ensuring the fairness of decision-making for siting hazardous facilities. The paper also points out that equal opportunity to environmental protection and free informed consent are important rights. Finally, it presents a case study on the proposed uranium enrichment facility near Homer, Louisiana and argues that siting the plant would violate norms of distributive equity and free informed consent. It concludes that siting the facility is a case of environmental injustice and likely an example of environmental racism or classism.

Keywords

informed consent equity fairness Louisiana pollution racism radiation rights uranium 

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Copyright information

© Journal of Agricultural and Environmental Ethics 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Daniel C. Wigley
    • 1
  • Kristin Shrader-Frechette
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhilosophyUniversity of South FloridaTampaUSA

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