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Ten-year survey of quinolone resistance inEscherichia coli causing urinary tract infections

  • E. Pérez-Trallero
  • M. Urbieta
  • D. Jimenez
  • J. M. García-Arenzana
  • G. Cilla
Notes

Abstract

In a ten-year survey (1983–1992) of quinolone resistance inEscherichia coli causing urinary tract infections in a general practice patient population, 9,934 strains were tested. Resistance increased remarkably from 1989 onwards. The rate of resistance to pipemidic acid was ≤6 % before 1989 and 18 % in 1992; the rate of resistance to ciprofloxacin (MIC≥4mg/l) was 0.8 % in 1989 and 7.1 % in 1992. Although the consumption of older quinolones decreased the total consumption of quinolones increased yearly.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Patient Population Urinary Tract Tract Infection General Practice 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1993

Authors and Affiliations

  • E. Pérez-Trallero
    • 1
  • M. Urbieta
    • 1
  • D. Jimenez
    • 1
  • J. M. García-Arenzana
    • 1
  • G. Cilla
    • 1
  1. 1.Servicio de Microbiología y Unidad de Epidemiología InfecciosaHospital NS AránzazuSan SebastiánSpain

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