Bactericidal activity of enoxacin and Lomefloxacin againstEscherichia coli KL16

  • C. S. Lewin
  • S. G. B. Amyes
  • J. T. Smith
Notes New Antimicrobial Agents

Abstract

Enoxacin and lomefloxacin were found to display a biphasic response when their bactericidal activities were investigated againstEscherichia coli KL16 in nutrient broth. Although enoxacin required bacterial protein and RNA synthesis to exert bactericidal activity, it was able to kill non-dividing bacteria. On the other hand, the protein synthesis inhibitor chloramphenicol and the RNA synthesis inhibitor rifampicin did not abolish enoxacin's killing activity againstEscherichia coli KL16 in nutrient broth. Lomefloxacin was also shown to be active against non-dividingEscherichia coli KL16.

Keywords

Internal Medicine Protein Synthesis Bactericidal Activity Rifampicin Chloramphenicol 

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Copyright information

© Friedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • C. S. Lewin
    • 1
  • S. G. B. Amyes
    • 1
  • J. T. Smith
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of BacteriologyUniversity of EdinburghEdinburghUK
  2. 2.Microbiology Section, Department of PharmaceuticsThe School of PharmacyLondonUK

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