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African Archaeological Review

, Volume 13, Issue 3, pp 171–196 | Cite as

Technological change in the Earlier and Middle Stone Age of Kalambo Falls (Zambia)

  • Peter J. Sheppard
  • Marine R. Kleindienst
Articles

Abstract

This paper reviews data on technological change in the manufacture of stone tools from the Earlier Stone Age (ESA) to Middle Stone Age (MSA including Sangoan) deposits at Site A, Kalambo Falls, Zambia. Data on flake and tool morphology, dimensions, and raw material are discussed It is concluded that there is little change, at this site, in the basic techniques of blank production or the attributes of the blanks produced from the ESA to the MSA. The only marked change to occur is the loss of large cutting tools (hand axes, cleavers) and their replacement by heavy-duty forms (core axes, picks). It is hypothesized that this change marks a decline in portability as a factor in the design of large edge tools.

Key words

Earlier Stone Age Middle Stone Age Acheulean Kalambo Falls Zambia 

Résumé

Cet article donne un compte rendu des donnés sur la change technologique dans la fabrication des outils lithiques en les dépôts du Earlier Stone Age (ESA) jusqu'a la Middle Stone Age (MSA, qui comprit la Sangoan) au gisement A, Kalambo Falls, Zambia. Des donnés sur la morphologie, les dimensions et les matériaux des éclats et des outils sont examinées. Il est inféré qu'il y a peu de changement, à ce gisement, dans le techniques élémentaires de la fabrication des supports ou dans les attributs des supports taillés du ESA jusqu'a MSA. Le seule change qui se présent ç'est la perte des gros outils pour couper (bifaces, hachereaux) et leur remplacement par des formes plus substantiels (core axes, pics). On fait l'hypothèse que ce changement indique une déclin de portabilité comme facteur dans le dessein des outils avec des grands tranchants.

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Sheppard
    • 1
  • Marine R. Kleindienst
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of AnthropologyUniversity of AucklandAucklandNewZealand
  2. 2.Department of Anthropology, Erindale CollegeUniversity of TorontoMississaugaCanada

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