Serological techniques for diagnosis of fungal infection

  • L. de Repentigny
Current Topic: Review

Abstract

This review summarizes recent developments in the serodiagnosis of candidiasis, aspergillosis, cryptococcosis, histoplasmosis, blastomycosis, coccidioidomycosis, mucormycosis and sporotrichosis. A number of studies have substantiated the presence of circulating antigens in invasive candidiasis, invasive aspergillosis, disseminated histoplasmosis and coccidioidomycosis, and immunoassays for antigen detection provide moderate sensitivity but high specificity for disease. Improved detection may result mainly from repeated serum or concentrated urine samplings rather than from the development of more sensitive immunoassays. Immunoblot analysis of the serological response is a useful tool for the identification of immunogenic fungal components that elicit a specific antibody response in invasive disease. This method, and others, have been successfully applied to the study of the immune response to several fungi, includingCandida, Aspergillus andRhizopus.

Keywords

Candidiasis Aspergillosis Moderate Sensitivity Invasive Aspergillosis Invasive Disease 

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Copyright information

© Priedr. Vieweg & Sohn Verlagsgesellschaft mbH 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • L. de Repentigny
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of Microbiology and Immunology, Faculty of MedicineUniversity of Montreal, and Ste-Justine HospitalMontrealCanada

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