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Experientia

, Volume 39, Issue 1, pp 112–114 | Cite as

Variations in male oriental fruit moth courtship patterns due to male competition

  • T. C. Baker
Short Communications Neurobiology, Behavior

Summary

In a laboratory flight tunnel, the first oriental fruit moth males to arrive near females had the highest rate of mating success and performed the standard sequence of behaviors including a hairpencil display that attracted females. Late arrivals performed atypical courtship patterns that enabled them to sneak copulations or disrupt first males' courtships to succeed in mating occasionally.

Keywords

Mating Success Male Competition Standard Sequence Late Arrival Moth Male 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Refences

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1983

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. C. Baker
    • 1
  1. 1.Division of Toxicology and Physiology, Department of EntomologyUniversity of CaliforniaRiversideUSA

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