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European Journal of Pediatrics

, Volume 149, Issue 10, pp 691–694 | Cite as

Agranulocytosis following infectious mononucleosis

  • S. Sumimoto
  • Y. Kasajima
  • T. Hamamoto
  • T. Miyanomae
  • Y. Iwai
  • M. Mayumi
  • H. Mikawa
Hematology/Oncology

Abstract

A girl developed acute agranulocytosis (45/mm3), 37 days after the onset of infectious mononucleosis. The bone marrow showed myeloid hyperplasia with maturation arrest and erythroid hypoplasia. A normal amount of colony forming units of granulocytes and macrophages (CFU-GM) colonies with a relative high number of clusters was observed. Neither anti-neutrophil antibodies nor circulating inhibitors of colony growth were found in serum. Granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) activity in the patient's serum rose at this time. The agranulocytosis lasted 5 days and her clinical state soon improved. These results suggested that agranulocytosis was presumably not due to serum factors, including auto-antibodies and/or suppressive substances, and that Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) had some direct or indirect effect on the marrow cells of the myeloid series.

Key words

Agranulocytosis Infectious mononucleosis GM-CSF CFU-GM 

Abbreviations

CFU-GM

colony forming unit of granulocyte and macrophage

EBV

Epstein-Barr virus

GM-CSF

granulocyte and macrophage colony stimulating factor

IM

infectious mononucleosis

MNC

mononuclear cells

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Copyright information

© Springer-Verlag 1990

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Sumimoto
    • 1
  • Y. Kasajima
    • 1
  • T. Hamamoto
    • 1
  • T. Miyanomae
    • 2
  • Y. Iwai
    • 2
  • M. Mayumi
    • 2
  • H. Mikawa
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of PaediatricsSumitomo HospitalOsakaJapan
  2. 2.Department of PaediatricsKyoto University HospitalKyotoJapan

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