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African Archaeological Review

, Volume 13, Issue 1, pp 35–76 | Cite as

Prehistoric exchange and interaction in southeastern southern africa: Marine shells and ostrich eggshell

  • Peter J. Mitchell
Article

Abstract

The spatiotemporal distribution of seashells and ostrich eggshell in the Later Stone Age of southeastern southern Africa is used to infer several areas of social interaction. The inferred patterns are supported by comparisons with preferences for lithic raw materials and the distribution of bifacial stone arrows. Plusiers zones de l'interaction sociale sont déduites des distributions chronologiques et spatiales de la coquillage et de la coquille de'autruche de l'Age de la Pierre Récent au sud- est de l'Afrique australe. Ces distributions sont soutenues des préférences pour des matières premières lithiques et de la distribution des flèches bifaciales de la pierre.

Key words

exchange interaction seashells ostrich eggshell Later Stone Age southern Africa 

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Copyright information

© Plenum Publishing Corporation 1996

Authors and Affiliations

  • Peter J. Mitchell
    • 1
  1. 1.Pitt Rivers MuseumUniversity of OxfordOxfordUK

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