Experientia

, Volume 45, Issue 2, pp 191–192 | Cite as

Preliminary observations of a bacteriophage infectingXenorhabdus luminescens (Enterobacteriaceae)

  • G. O. PoinarJr
  • R. T. Hess
  • W. Lanier
  • S. Kinney
  • J. H. White
Short Communications

Summary

A bacteriophage infective toXenorhabdus luminescens, a bacterial symbiont of heterorhabditid nematodes, was recovered from insects that supported poor nematode development. Plaque tests showed the phage particles to be infective only to primary and not secondary colonies ofX. luminescens. The phage was not infective toX. nenatophilus primaries or secondaries. The bacteriophage particles ranged 80–90 nm in length, with the head ranging from 40 to 50 nm in diameter. Restriction analysis was performed on isolated bacteriophage DNA. This first report of a bacteriophage fromXenorhabdus species has pratical implications since it could be detrimental to cultures ofHeterorhabditis nematodes that are being produced throughout the world for the biological control of insects.

Key words

Bacteriophage Xenorhabdus Heterorhabditis bacteria nenatoda 

References

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    Thomas, G. M., and Poinar, G. O. Jr, Int. J. syst. Bact.29 (1979) 352.Google Scholar
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    Krieg, N. R., ed., Bergey's Manual of Systematic Bacteriology, vol. 1, pp. 510–512 (1984).Google Scholar
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    Birnboim, H. C., and Doly, J., Nucleic Acids Res.7 (1979) 1513.PubMedGoogle Scholar
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    Poinar, G. O. Jr, Hess, R., and Thomas, G., JCRS Med. Sci.8 (1980). 141.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag Basel 1989

Authors and Affiliations

  • G. O. PoinarJr
    • 1
  • R. T. Hess
    • 1
  • W. Lanier
    • 2
  • S. Kinney
    • 2
  • J. H. White
    • 2
  1. 1.Division of Entomology and ParasitologyUniversity of CaliforniaBerkeleyUSA
  2. 2.BIOSYSPalo AltoUSA

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