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African Archaeological Review

, Volume 12, Issue 1, pp 43–72 | Cite as

Middle and Later Stone Age lithic technology and land use in East African savannas

  • Sibel Barut
Article

Abstract

This paper examines changes in the use of sites and lithic raw materials during the later Middle Stone Age (MSA) and early Later Stone Age (LSA) in East Africa. It proposes two models of hunter-gatherer land use and technological organization in East African savannas and examines changes in the procurement and use of raw materials in MSA and LSA lithic assemblage sequences from Lukenya Hill, Kenya, and Nasera Rockshelter, Tanzania. Changes in procurement strategies across the transition are related to technological change, mechanical properties of raw materials, and changes in site use and in mobility.

Keywords

Mechanical Property Technological Change Cultural Study Technological Organization Procurement Strategy 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

Résumé

Cet article examine les effets de l'existence locale de matières premières lithiques en Afrique orientale au cours du paléolithique moyenne et au début du paléolithique supérieure. Il propose deux modèles d'utilisation de la terre et d'organisation technologique par les populations des savannes d'Afrique orientale vivant de la chasse et de la cueillette, et examine les changements sur le plan de l'approvisionnement en matières premières et de leur utilisation dans les séries de collections lithiques du paléolithique moyenne et du paléolithique supérieure provenant de Lukenya Hill au Kénya et de Nasera Rockshelter en Tanzanie. Les modifications des stratégies d'approvisionnement au cours de la transition correspondent au changement de technologie, aux caractéristiques mécaniques des matières premières et aux changements dans l'utilisation des sites et la mobilité.

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  • Sibel Barut

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