Experientia

, Volume 40, Issue 5, pp 410–416 | Cite as

The sleep-wakefulness rhythm, exogenous and endogenous factors (in man)

  • D. S. Minors
  • J. M. Waterhouse
Article

Keywords

Endogenous Factor 

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1984

Authors and Affiliations

  • D. S. Minors
    • 1
  • J. M. Waterhouse
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyUniversity of ManchesterManchester(England)

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