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Experientia

, Volume 37, Issue 12, pp 1346–1347 | Cite as

Development of the hypothalamic-hypophysial-gonadotrophic activities in fetal rats

  • S. Daikoku
  • T. Adachi
  • H. Kawano
  • K. Wakabayashi
Specialia

Summary

Pituitary responsiveness to LHRH and anti-LHRH serum was investigated in fetal rats aged 18.5–22.5 days. Synthetic LHRH injection in utero into fetuses brought about a remarkable depletion of pituitary-LH with a corresponding increase of serum-LH on day 18.5. On the contrary, anti-LHRH serum administration to day-20.5 fetuses caused a significant augmentation of pituitary-LH 1 day later. These data indicate that LH-gonadotrophs respond to LHRH even on day 18.5, and that endogenous LHRH begins to affect LH-gonadotrophs on day 20.5.

Keywords

Significant Augmentation Pituitary Responsiveness Serum Administration Synthetic LHRH Remarkable Depletion 
These keywords were added by machine and not by the authors. This process is experimental and the keywords may be updated as the learning algorithm improves.

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • S. Daikoku
    • 1
    • 2
  • T. Adachi
    • 1
    • 2
  • H. Kawano
    • 1
    • 2
  • K. Wakabayashi
    • 1
    • 2
  1. 1.Department of Anatomy, School of MedicineUniversity of TokushimaTokushima(Japan)
  2. 2.Hormone Assay Center, Institute of EndocrinologyGunma UniversityMaebashi(Japan)

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