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Experientia

, Volume 38, Issue 2, pp 176–189 | Cite as

Lignochemicals

  • K. W. Hanselmann
Conversion of Biomass to Fuel and Chemical Raw Material

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1982

Authors and Affiliations

  • K. W. Hanselmann
    • 1
  1. 1.Institute of Plant Biology, Department of MicrobiologyUniversity of ZürichZürich(Switzerland)

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