Papers of the Regional Science Association

, Volume 11, Issue 1, pp 309–334 | Cite as

On the measurement of economic development using scalogram analysis

  • Magdi M. El-Kammash
Regional Analysis Studies

Keywords

Economic Development Scalogram Analysis 

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Literatur

  1. 1.
    An example of this is the case we are going to deal with, namely the measurement of economic development. Here we are aware of errors involved in the process of collection and estimation, but also we know that these errors are concentrated more in the area of underdeveloped countries. Thus, the errors are not randomly distributed.Google Scholar
  2. 2.
    Eugene Staley,The Future of Underdeveloped Countries, Harper & Brothers, New York, 1954, pp. 14–18.Google Scholar
  3. 3.
    He used these two variables to “...classify countries for which income data are lacking, but also in a few instances to determine whether or not a country should be in a lower or higher group than the one in which income estimates alone would place it”,ibid., p. 17, n. 3.Google Scholar
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    Harvey Leibenstein,Economic Backwardness and Economic Growth, New York, John Wiley & Sons, 1957, Ch. 2.Google Scholar
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    Edward G. Stockwell, “The Measurement of Economic Development,”Economic Development and Cultural Change, Vol. VIII, Number 4, Part I, July 1960, pp. 419–432. For a discussion of this index, see the author's: “Mr. Stockwell's Infant Mortality Index For Measuring Economic Development: A Comment,”Milbank Quarterly, Vol. XL, Number 1, January 1962, pp. 112–119.CrossRefGoogle Scholar
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    Norman S. Buchanan and Howard S. Ellis,Approaches to Economic Development, New York, the Twentieth Century Fund, 1955, pp. 3–22.Google Scholar
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    “Ideally, one would like some over-all index of human well-being which would overcome the ‘weighting problem’ implicit in partial indexes. But at present this ideal cannot be fully realized.”Ibid., p. 6.Google Scholar
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    Ibid.“Ideally, one would like some over-all index of human well-being which would overcome the ‘weighting problem’ implicit in partial indexes. But at present this ideal cannot be fully realized.”, p. 7.Google Scholar
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    Ibid.“Ideally, one would like some over-all index of human well0being which would overcome the ‘weighting problem’ implicit in partial indexes. But at present this ideal cannot be fully realized.”, p. 7.Google Scholar
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    Nathaniel B. Guyol, “Energy Consumption and Economic Development,” inEssays on Geography and Economic Development, edited by Norton Ginsburg, Department of Geography Research paper No. 62, The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, 1960, Part III, Chapter V.Google Scholar
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    He rejected the multi-factor indices because “It not only is difficult to select the components of development, it also is difficult to determine the importance that should be assigned to each if they are to be combined.”Ibid., p. 65. His rejection to the use of single economic variables such as national income or some variant of it is based on: 1) the unavailability of data, 2) the lack of comparison between countries. But is it not extremely difficult to obtain data on energy consumption especially from underdeveloped countries?Google Scholar
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    Lyle W. Shannon,Underdeveloped Areas, New York, Harper & Brothers 1957, pp. 5–11.Google Scholar
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    Although there may appear to be similarities between Berry's work and mine, the objectives, rationale and method are quite different. See Brian J. L. Berry, “An Inductive Approach to the Regionalization of Economic Development” in Norton Ginsburg, ed.,Essays on Geography and Economic Development, Department of Geography Research paper No. 62, The University of Chicago Press, Chicago, Illinois, 1960, pp. 78–107.Google Scholar
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    Berry's approach is the best for this problem. But the nature of the data, especially from underdeveloped countries, on the 43 variables he started with do not allow the use of what Ginsburg called, in the introduction to those essays, “sophisticated statistical techniques.” Availability and nature of the data should be considered first in deciding which statistical techniques should be used.Google Scholar
  16. 16.
    As an illustration, take per capita income, a factor which is used by some economists as an index of development. Sudden and wide changes in per capita income may occur because of external factors which have no relation to economic development, an example might be a change in the international prices of a major export commodity. Thus to rely on per capita income as an indicator of development may indicate changes not really significant for economic development.Google Scholar
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    Louis Guttman, “The Problem of Attitude and Opinion Measurement,” in Samuel A. Stouffer et al,Measurement and Prediction, (Princeton, New Jersey, Princeton University Press, 1950), Ch. 2, p. 64.Google Scholar
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    Ibid., pp. 88.Google Scholar
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    ibid., p. 64.Google Scholar
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    See Appendix A for regression model, estimation and the regression equation.Google Scholar
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    Cf. Appendix C, Table C3.Google Scholar
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    Simon Kuznets, “Quantitative Aspects of the Growth of Nations, V: Capital Formation Proportions, International Comparisons for Recent Years,”Economic Development and Cultural Change, Vol. VIII, Number 4, Part II, July 1960, pp. 77–79.Google Scholar
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    Cf. Table B5, Appendix “B”.Google Scholar
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    Eugene Staley,The Future of Underdeveloped Contries, Harper and Brothers, New York, 1954, pp. 14–18.Google Scholar
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    Edward G. Stockwell, “The Measurement of Economic Development,”Economic Development and Cultural Change, Vol. VIII, Number 4, Part I, July 1960, pp. 425–426.Google Scholar
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    This might be due to the small number of countries he included.Google Scholar
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    Stockwell,op. cit. Edward G. Stockwell, “.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© The Regional Science Association 1963

Authors and Affiliations

  • Magdi M. El-Kammash
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of EconomicsNorth Carolina State CollegeUSA

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