BIT Numerical Mathematics

, Volume 21, Issue 3, pp 245–254 | Cite as

Types in a mixed language system

  • Ph. Darondeau
  • P. Le Guernic
  • M. Raynal
Part I. Computer Science

Abstract

As a support for writing software, a comprehensive set of problem oriented languages appears preferable to any so-called universal language, as soon as static checking is sufficient to ensure type correctness of the mixed language program. We lay the basis for a mixed language system where this requirement is fulfilled. The general outline of the system is first sketched. Detailed consideration is then given to our basic constructs for establishing communication between languages, namely “standard” types and “foreign” types. “Abstract” types, such as defined in CLU, are finally shown to be a particular class of “foreign” types.

Index terms

Foreign types Interfaces Modules Mixed languages Procedures Type checking 

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References

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    C. A. Lang,Languages for writing systems programs, inSoftware Engineering Techniques, Buxton and Randell Ed., Nato Conference report, pp. 101–106, April 1970.Google Scholar
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    C. M. Geschke, J. H. Morris and E. W. Satterthwaite,Some experience with MESA, Commun. Ass. Comput. Mach., vol. 20, pp. 540–553, August 1977.Google Scholar
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    D. L. Parnas,On the criteria to be used in decomposing systems into modules, Commun. Ass. Comput. Mach., vol. 15, pp. 1053–1058, December 1972.Google Scholar
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    B. H. Liskov and S. N. Zilles,Programming with abstract data types, inProc. ACM-SIGPLAN conf. on Very High Level Languages, also SIGPLAN Notices, vol. 9, pp. 50–59, April 1974.Google Scholar

Copyright information

© BIT Foundations 1981

Authors and Affiliations

  • Ph. Darondeau
    • 1
  • P. Le Guernic
    • 1
  • M. Raynal
    • 1
  1. 1.IRISA CNRS et INRIARennes CedexFrance

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