Experientia

, Volume 34, Issue 4, pp 488–490 | Cite as

The effect of adrenaline on the electrogenic Na+ pump in cardiac muscle cells

  • T. Akasu
  • Y. Ohta
  • K. Koketsu
Article

Summary

Electrogenic Na+ pump currents during K+-activated hyperpolarizations of bullfrog atrium muscle fibres are increased by adrenaline. The log dose-response relation between these currents and activating K+ concentrations is expressed by a sigmoidal curve, which is shifted in parallel to the left by adrenaline. It is suggested that adrenaline increases the rate of Na+ extrusion without increasing the Na/K coupling ratio and the total number of pumping sites.

Keywords

Muscle Cell Adrenaline Cardiac Muscle Sigmoidal Curve Cardiac Muscle Cell 

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Copyright information

© Birkhäuser Verlag 1978

Authors and Affiliations

  • T. Akasu
    • 1
  • Y. Ohta
    • 1
  • K. Koketsu
    • 1
  1. 1.Department of PhysiologyKurume University School of MedicineKurume(Japan)

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